Effects of tire inclination (turning traffic) and dynamic loading on the pavement stress–strain responses using 3-D finite element modeling

Xiaodi Hu, Abu N.M. Faruk, Jun Zhang, Mena I. Souliman, Lubinda F. Walubita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, ABAQUS finite element (FE) modeling in three-dimensional (3-D) loading mode was utilized to analytically investigate and quantify the effects of tire inclination and dynamic loading on the stress–strain responses of a pavement structure under varying loading and environmental conditions. The input variables for modeling consisted of actual laboratory and field data obtained from an in-service highway US 59 and included the in-situ pavement structure, material properties (i.e., modulus and shear strength), traffic, and climatic (i.e., temperature) data. Computational modeling and sensitivity analyses were conducted through variation of the following two input variables with a focus on the top surfacing hot-mix asphalt (HMA) layer: a) tire inclination angle to simulate turning traffic, and, b) dynamic loading to simulate accelerating, steady rolling, and decelerating (braking) traffic. The generated maximum shear stress and vertical strain responses were then analyzed and correlated to the HMA material strength and the actual measured/observed field rutting performance data. The corresponding results indicated that inclined tires (simulating turning traffic) and decelerating (braking) vehicles induced the most severe shear stresses and vertical strains on the pavement structure in terms of magnitude (i.e., increased); exceeding the HMA material strength in some cases. Thus, for pavement design and structural analysis purposes, the following critical highway areas that may be subjected to extreme stresses and strains due to turning and stopping (braking) traffic, particularly in high temperature environments, should be given more attention with respect to material strength characterization to mitigate potential shear/rutting failures: intersections, junctions; urban stop–go sections, and curves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-314
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Pavement Research and Technology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Pavements
Tires
Braking
Asphalt
Shear stress
Temperature
Hard facing
ABAQUS
Structural analysis
Shear strength
Materials properties

Keywords

  • 3-D FE stress–strain modeling
  • Rutting
  • Shear deformation
  • Shear stress
  • Vertical strains

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Effects of tire inclination (turning traffic) and dynamic loading on the pavement stress–strain responses using 3-D finite element modeling. / Hu, Xiaodi; Faruk, Abu N.M.; Zhang, Jun; Souliman, Mena I.; Walubita, Lubinda F.

In: International Journal of Pavement Research and Technology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 304-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, Xiaodi; Faruk, Abu N.M.; Zhang, Jun; Souliman, Mena I.; Walubita, Lubinda F. / Effects of tire inclination (turning traffic) and dynamic loading on the pavement stress–strain responses using 3-D finite element modeling.

In: International Journal of Pavement Research and Technology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 304-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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