Genomics of parallel experimental evolution in drosophila

J. L. Graves, K. L. Hertweck, M. A. Phillips, M. V. Han, L. G. Cabral, T. T. Barter, L. F. Greer, M. K. Burke, L. D. Mueller, M. R. Rose, Nadia Singh

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

What are the genomic foundations of adaptation in sexual populations? We address this question using fitness-character and whole-genome sequence data from 30 Drosophila laboratory populations. These 30 populations are part of a nearly 40-year laboratory radiation featuring 3 selection regimes, each shared by 10 populations for up to 837 generations, with moderately large effective population sizes. Each of 3 sets of the 10 populations that shared a selection regime consists of 5 populations that have long been maintained under that selection regime, paired with 5 populations that had only recently been subjected to that selection regime. We find a high degree of evolutionary parallelism in fitness phenotypes when most-recent selection regimes are shared, as in previous studies from our laboratory. We also find genomic parallelism with respect to the frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, transposable elements, insertions, and structural variants, which was expected. Entirely unexpected was a high degree of parallelism for linkage disequilibrium. The evolutionary genetic changes among these sexual populations are rapid and genomically extensive. This pattern may be due to segregating functional genetic variation that is abundantly maintained genome-wide by selection, variation that responds immediately to changes of selection regime.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages831-842
Number of pages12
JournalMolecular Biology and Evolution
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Genomics
Drosophila
Population
genomics
laboratory
fitness
genome
Genome
effective population size
disequilibrium
genetic variation
phenotype
polymorphism
radiation
DNA Transposable Elements
Linkage Disequilibrium
Population Density
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Radiation
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Experimental evolution
  • Population genomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Graves, J. L., Hertweck, K. L., Phillips, M. A., Han, M. V., Cabral, L. G., Barter, T. T., ... Singh, N. (2017). Genomics of parallel experimental evolution in drosophila. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 34(4), 831-842. DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msw282

Genomics of parallel experimental evolution in drosophila. / Graves, J. L.; Hertweck, K. L.; Phillips, M. A.; Han, M. V.; Cabral, L. G.; Barter, T. T.; Greer, L. F.; Burke, M. K.; Mueller, L. D.; Rose, M. R.; Singh, Nadia.

In: Molecular Biology and Evolution, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 831-842.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Graves, JL, Hertweck, KL, Phillips, MA, Han, MV, Cabral, LG, Barter, TT, Greer, LF, Burke, MK, Mueller, LD, Rose, MR & Singh, N 2017, 'Genomics of parallel experimental evolution in drosophila' Molecular Biology and Evolution, vol 34, no. 4, pp. 831-842. DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msw282
Graves JL, Hertweck KL, Phillips MA, Han MV, Cabral LG, Barter TT et al. Genomics of parallel experimental evolution in drosophila. Molecular Biology and Evolution. 2017 Apr 1;34(4):831-842. Available from, DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msw282
Graves, J. L. ; Hertweck, K. L. ; Phillips, M. A. ; Han, M. V. ; Cabral, L. G. ; Barter, T. T. ; Greer, L. F. ; Burke, M. K. ; Mueller, L. D. ; Rose, M. R. ; Singh, Nadia. / Genomics of parallel experimental evolution in drosophila. In: Molecular Biology and Evolution. 2017 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 831-842
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